Recovery Stories

There is concrete evidence that recovery from mild to moderate dementia may be possible using a different approach. Learn more about Sharp Again’s new approach.

Anne Panson

Anne Panson

After an ischemic stroke, Anne, 86, is placed into Hospice care. Her medical team tells the family “Medically, there is nothing more we can do.” An MRI shows brain shrinkage. Anne’s medical team diagnoses “terminal vascular dementia” and gives her less than 2 weeks to live. Anne can’t move anything but her eyes and mouth and she can turn her head 45 degrees. She knows no one. She sleeps 18+hrs/day. Learn more about Anne’s story.

Dr. Shanhong Lu

Dr. Shanhong Lu

I was young, strong, and—I thought—invincible until about ten years ago when I started noticing an obvious decline in my intellectual function, energy, and short-term memory. I noticed a shift after a few small, seemingly insignificant head and neck injuries coupled with daily stress from running around between the hospital and my practice.  I couldn’t read a one-page article, much less a book. I couldn’t remember which patients I saw on a given day and had to constantly write down clues and notes.  I also developed brain fog and significant fatigue in the afternoon and other symptoms typical of the thyroid, adrenal, and gender hormone dysfunction. Learn more about Dr. Lu’s story.

Harold

Harold's Recovery Story

About eight years ago, when I was 52, I started feeling foggy, and had occasional lapses in memory. My wife, Mary, started to notice it, too, but I also have hearing issues so she thought that was the problem. My memory worsened very gradually over the years, and we lived with it, compensating as needed. I became less social. After about five years, it got to the point where we couldn’t keep making excuses or ignoring it. I had gone from doing our grocery shopping without a list, to going with a list, to having the list but not buying what was on it. Learn more about Harold’s story.